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      home : book reviews : The Age of Wire and String by Ben Marcus

Occasionally Asked Questions





Do you accept poetry submissions?
Do you need any more reviewers?
Do you accept submissions of short stories or articles?
Do you pay your contributors?
If I submit something to you how do I know you won’t steal it?
I’m going to steal something from you – what are you going to do about it?
Do you make any money out of The Richmond Review?
So why do you do it?
Why is the magazine called The Richmond Review?
Is there a print version of The Richmond Review?
How often is the magazine published?
Will you please review my book?
Can I put a link to x-page at your site?
Do you know the email address for x-publisher?
Can you please tell me how to contact x-famous-author?
Do you know where I can get a copy of x-book?
Can you please forward a message to Edward Thomas? I think his poetry is wonderful.
I’ve written this fantastic novel. Can you help me find a publisher?

Do you accept poetry submissions?

Yes! Please see our Submissions Guidelines Page before submitting

Do you need any more reviewers?

If you want to review some books for us, take a look at some of our reviews and send in a few samples of your work. Reviews should normally be between 300-500 words

Do you accept submissions of short stories or articles?

Yes! Please see our Submissions Guidelines Page before submitting

Do you pay your contributors?

It has been known to happen, but generally no. Our contributors let us use their writing for various reasons, but for now receiving money isn’t one of them. Half a dozen of our writers, previously unpublished, have gone on to find paid writing work with established paper magazines at least partly on the basis of their work for us (but mainly because they’re good writers). Others understand the benefits of having their poetry or prose showcased in a high quality literary magazine with a decent international readership. Still others contribute for the sheer pleasure of reading a book or watching a movie and then expressing a considered opinion as well as they are able

If I submit something to you how do I know you won’t steal it?

Because if you wrote it it’s protected by international copyright laws which we make every effort to respect. We won’t publish anything unless we have your permission (probably written) and are convinced you own the copyright. If we agree to publish something by you, you’ll be fully accredited as the author and our readers’ attention will be drawn to the license under which we publish material. We typically ask for a non-exclusive license from our contributors, allowing us to publish the work for a limited term

I’m going to steal something from you – what are you going to do about it?

OK, so no one has actually asked us this question, but: if we find that you’ve placed our material on your Web site or distributed it in any way in breach of our conditions of use, we’ll ask you to remove the material and not abuse it again. The reason we’ll ask you to remove it is because you’re probably in breach of the author’s copyright – and sometimes in breach of a copyright licensed to a billion dollar megacorp with a big, nasty legal team. We have a moral (but normally not legal) duty to protect our authors’ interests and we believe that it’s best for our authors’ works only to be available from a site they or we have sanctioned – an "authoritative source" – where they and their readers can be reasonably confident that a true version of their work will be held

If you refuse to remove offending material, we’ll write to your system administrator who may disable your account with immediate effect. They are likely to do this because they have as little interest in getting involved in legal action as we do. Their example is worth noting. Test cases are notoriously expensive to fight

If we find we are unable to force the removal of copyright material we’ll contact the copyright owner, at which point the case is no longer our responsibility unless The Richmond Review actually owns the copyright. In either case you can assume that someone, somewhere, will be talking to a lawyer

Stealing stuff from us, or any other site on the Web, is stupid and unnecessary. It duplicates resources in an unwelcome way and potentially endangers both our own publishing programme and others like it – authors, agents and publishers still have only a fragile trust in the honesty of Internet users. You can help us build their confidence by treating their copyrights with the respect they deserve. If you like something we publish, just place a link to it – your own readers will respect you far more than if you just nick it. A very small number of works held at this site may be freely distributable by electronic means and under certain conditions. If this is the case it will be clearly stated at the foot of the feature

If you’d like to mirror the entire magazine, that’s another issue. We’ll tend to be very cautious before allowing this but we’re open to offers. Just don’t expect to see any money from us because, since you ask:

Do you make any money out of The Richmond Review?

No, but not because we’d have any objection to making money from it. The fact is we’re too busy producing it to find the time to go looking for advertisers and sponsors. And it doesn’t help that we’re a little picky about what we want to advertise or who we’d like sponsorship from. We’re talking gravitas, here. We’re talking ethics

But if you’re an advertiser or if you’d like to sponsor The Richmond Review, drop us a line. We’re flexible, we’re well read, and we’re probably a lot less insidious, grasping and greedy than you are

So why do you do it?

Because it’s fun. We get to hang out with people we like, we get to cheerlead for great writers like James Ellroy or Eddie Bunker and help promote younger, newer writers like Vivien Kelly or Jason Starr. And we get a great big kick out of the fact that some paper magazines – naming no names – have spent £500 000 on setting up some lousy, shitty Web site that gets fewer readers than we do. Ha!

Why is the magazine called The Richmond Review?

Because it’s currently based in the borough of Richmond-upon-Thames in South West London. And because we wanted a name which didn’t include the words "cyber", "tech", "Net", "Web" etc. etc. etc.

Is there a print version of The Richmond Review?

Not at the moment, but it’s something we’re considering. We’d need some investment first

How often is the magazine published?

Approximately monthly – if you check back every five weeks there’s a good chance we’ll have released another issue, but if you want to make sure you don’t miss a major update, enter your email address in one of the ‘Subscriber Mailing List’ forms you’ll find on each page of the magaine, then press subscribe and you’ll be added to the list. The list won’t be used for any other purpose, will be kept confidential, and unsubscribing is easy

Will you please review my book?

In principle we’re happy to receive review copies from both individual authors and publishers of books written in the English language and published anywhere in the world. We can’t promise to review them or enter into any correspondence about any review or lack of one, however, and books will not be returned. Review copies should be sent to The Richmond Review, c/o High Stakes, 21 Great Ormond Street, London WC1N 3JB

Can I put a link to x-page at your site?

By all means. Link to any page at our site at will. If you let us know that you’ve done so we’ll keep you informed if the page you’ve linked to moves or changes. We archive all pages on their original paths and they’re intended to stay at the site for a couple of years. If you want a link from our links directory to your site, please go to the appropriate category and use the “Add URL” link. Since we use the Open Directory for our links, your site will also appear on many other web sites when it has been accepted for inclusion

Do you know the email address for x-publisher?

We recommend booktrade.info in the UK and Bookwire.com in the USA for publishing-related information including some publisher contact details

Can you please tell me how to contact x-famous-author?

Having carefully composed your letter – in your mind, in draft, whatever – take a fountain pen and a piece of good-quality paper, preferably made from wood grown in sustainable forests and manufactured in an environmentally sensitive way, and write your letter as legibly and stylishly as you are able. Place the letter in an envelope and, on the envelope, write the name of the author, the name of the imprint under which his or her books are published, the name of the publisher which owns this imprint and the address of this publisher. This information is generally available in any recently printed edition of a work by the author you wish to write to. Apply a stamp of the appropriate value to the upper right hand corner of the envelope. Take the envelope containing your letter to the nearest post box and insert. Easy.

Do you know where I can get a copy of x-book?

Try Amazon.co.uk or BarnesandNoble.com, our current bookselling partners.

Can you please forward a message to Edward Thomas? I think his poetry is wonderful

We’ve recently added some sketchy biographical information to our Edward Thomas pages which explains that he did actually die in 1917. You’re right, though: his poems could have been written yesterday and he is among England’s greatest poets of this century, unsung and all. We hope you’ll keep coming back to look at our Edward Thomas pages and, indeed, if you’d like to help us maintain them your help would be welcome

I’ve written this fantastic novel. Can you help me find a publisher?

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